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20121222
20121230
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
begins, it's late july, 1992, and i'm on a flight from washington, d.c. to charlotte, north carolina. i had been an intern that summer up on capitol hill, and one of my regrets of the summer was that i'd never seen strom thurmond. because all my fellow interns said you've got to see strom thurmond. he such an unusual appearance about him. i did know what they meant really your but i had my suspicions. so i'm on the flight and a look ahead in front of me and i see a man who's got kind of orange colored hair practically, so brightly colored. first generation hair plugs. shows you how slow i am that i think to myself, that must be what strom thurmond's head looks like. then, of course, it wasn't strom thurmond. i knew that when people reaching over trying to shake his hand. i wanted to shake his hand, too, because i'd been in d.c. that summer for the first time, and i met all of these politicians i've seen a tv. i was about to go home and speak to my dads rotary club and i wanted to tell them all about the famous people i met up in washington, d.c. and so i was going to try to shake his ha
that it did. i was not on that trip, so i do not know specifically. i also visited libya in july. i also visited in september after the attack in benghazi. i can speak to my own experience. secretary clinton has said, all those of us as senior leaders are responsible for what is happening. i certainly hold myself accountable. i certainly had a lot of time to think about sharper questions i could have cost, sharper focus i could have provided. >> on your visit in july,, or september, the debt issue and specific come up? the folks on the ground say, we're worried about what has happened was security? >> no, there's no specific discussion about it. i did talk to ambassador stevens in general terms. in march of 2012? >> i am certain it did. we certainly emphasize the importance of not only improve in the security capabilities of the libyan interim government at that time. we offered a number of programs to help them build those institutions which are made one of the greatest weaknesses of the libyan it from government. -- interim government. >> your pretty sure that the issue came up, you ju
decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. enen you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? k i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little ginger boy, and i fell in love with him. >> reporter: the summers began filling their new jersey home with baby clothes, a crib, and even a stroller. they traveled to his orphanage in russia twice to bond with him. >> say, hi, daddy. >> reporter: you've given him a name. >> yes. preston mackey summers. he's a wonderful young boy who needs love and attention. >> reporter: like 1,500 other american families, the summers torry that the law banning opericans from adopting russian thedren could prevent them from bringing a child home. the law is widely seen as retaliation for a new american law banning russians accused of human rights violations from entering the united states. ctimsummers are hoping politics pn't stop them from becoming parents. on your last trip there, that was the last thing you said to him? m> i said
was to pass every appropriations bill by the fourth of july break. my staff said i am crazy. it was feasible if you went about the work seriously. by the fourth of the library, guess what? all of the bills had been passed. we were able to send everyone of those bills to the president's desk. they were signed in the law with bipartisan support. that sort of work can make a difference. more voices need to be heard in support of that effort. >> my recollection would be since then, it has been budgeting by continuing resolutions. >> we have done an awful lot. a lot of people do not realize we have demonstrated we can do this regular order. the more we move the committee back rather than having everything dominated in a speaker's office, the better off the congress will be. >> who loses and who gains when -- >> the existing agencies have their pipelines already clogged with money and we throw more money at it without any serious oversight. continuing resolutions are ignoring our responsibility and our goal is that we have got a job to do. it is time we get back to the responsibility. the sooner w
. [video clip] >> we took that vote back on july 25. it did not originate in the house. it has no chance of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is fo
was turning out to be really hard. july 1776 by december had turned into a editor, painful, depressive, demoralizing series. in washington rewrite a pamphlet called the crisis, which begins these are the times. washington understood the first you win the argument menu in the word. people had to believe. i came here to say to you, we have no reason to despair. you have no reason to back off. you have no reason. we have every reason to behave this parents. any questions? [applause] [applause] >> said the speaker has been kind enough to give us an temper questions than answers. if you have one come raise your hand. if you could wait to leak at the in your hand, so everyone can hear it, that would be great. we will start over here. >> first of all, mr. speaker, i'd like to congratulate you in thank you for coming out and be demanded to read that his willing to fight the good fight. we appreciate that. [applause] and i agree with you that we have also her, we've lost the battle we have to continue to pay. some of the things we should all think about going forward is a need to make sure the
. >> julie seger on c-span on verizon. c-span has been brought to you by your television provider as a public service. >> next, it is a global look at the economy with a speech by greek economist. among his many books, the economics professor recently minotaur" andobal natar we will show you as much as we can before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. th
and outs of capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service if by your television provider. >> "washington journal" continues. host: lawrence yun is the chief economist and senior vice president for the national association of realtors. how would you assess the housing markets today? guest: thanks for inviting me, peter. housing market has turned for the better in 2012. the home sales overall look to be about 10% better this year versus last. home prices on average are up about 5%. in some parts of the country, it's up better than 20%. you are seeing places like las vegas and miami where it's about a 10% gain. there's local market variation, but overall the housing market is recovering. host: if the u.s. government and american taxpayers go over the so called "fiscal cliff" what do you foresee for? the for? guest: the fiscal cliff is going to shave off about 4% of gdp, so that the national economic growth. currently is growing about 2%. you can do very simple mathematics. and we are back in a recessi
.l >> it is a great resource for anyone to know the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> dan burton is retiring from congress. he talked with c-span about his past investigations of the clinton investigation and the oversight role of congress. this is 30 minutes. >> how would you say the state is? >> it has changed a great deal. it is not the same as when i came 1983. there seemed to be more comedy. tip o'neill was speaker. i will never forget he was the first time he was on the floor raising cane with democrats. and he came down and started giving me the dickens. after that we became very good friends and played golf together. bob michael was a wonderful leader. there was a spirit of camaraderie even though we had differences politically then that we do not have now. now it is much more combative. i have a lot of friends on the democratic side of the aisle, very good friends. as far as working things out is not as easy as it used to be. >> what are some of the root causes? >> i think and i am not pointin
another rosa. >> my sister july 4th. your sister's spirit is with you. and was it that you didn't make it in time to say good guy. she is saying it's okay. we are only a thought away from spirit. spirits know that we love them. and she i know it's hard especially the first holiday she wants to you send to your family that she is okay. she is at peace. who had cancer? >> my sister. >> she had cancer. there is somebody else who has cancer who is deceased. >> my dad. >> your dad? she is with the other -- she is with your dad. >> she is with my dad. >> thank you so much. i'm so sorry for the people i didn't read for. i hope that if you have been through this sandy tragedy that everything works -- is working out for all of you. god bless you. thank you so much. [ applause ] >> wow, that means so much much to people. thank you. >> thank you so much. >> we will turn it over to steve. billy ray cyrus is still with us. so don't go away. is he going to perform that's what daddy's do when "fox & friends" christmas rolls on from new york city. [ applause ] ♪ that's what daddy's do ♪ shield you
rank in the foreign service career ambassador and became deputy secretary of state in july of 2011. she is only the second serving career diplomat in history to become deputy secretary and ambassador burns served from 2008 to 2011 as undersecretary for political affairs as assistant secretary of state for near eastern affairs from 01 to 05 and and esther jordan from 08 to 2001. ambassador burns served in a number of other posts in the foreign service in '82 and putting the executive secretary of the state department and a special assistant secretary to christopher albright and acting director of principal deputy director of the state department policy planning staff. ambassador burns is the recipient of the two presidential distinguished service awards and a member of department of state awards and all well learned. thank you. thomas nides is the deputy secretary of state for management and resources serving as the chief operating officer of the department. prior to joining the administration, mr. nides was the chief operating officer of morgan stanley from 2005 to 2010 before joining m
resource for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon, c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought as a public service by your television provider. [applause] >> justice anthony kennedy spoke at the heritage some asian as a part of a lecture series called preserve the constitution. he said it's the duty of every american to fulfill the constitution. he was introduced by the former attorney general's. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it's great for me to be able to join john and welcome you here to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture and i'm sure you all know the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity and civil society flourished. to help achieve this, the center for legal and judicial studies launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and educate citizens on topics related to the constitution and the rule of law. the preserved constitution s
for liberation who elected a pro-american government in july, who sought greater u.s. assistance to treat their wounded, train their national security forces come to secure their borders, build their democratic institutions, and expand the rule of law. libyans did not want al qaeda militias running amok in large parts of the country. that is the reality we now face. this is the broader failure of the administration's so-called life footprint approach toward libya. regardless of whom the president nominates to serve in his cabinet, we will continue to ask these questions and demand answers and accountability. i would like to concur with senator mccain. i thought the report was very detailed and the recommendations good and solid in terms of how to better understand the intelligence and run it, how to improve security on the ground, and there is much we can learn from this report. here is what we do know -- we know nothing about president obama before, during, and after the attack. they're making two movies about his use of in the bin laden rate, and he deserves that. it was well executed a
. >> julie watches c-span on verizon. treated by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your publ television provider. >> a cornell university law professor has written a book examining corporations and the focus on increasing their stock prices. she spoke at the clinton school of public service in arkansas. she describes the corporate world were the efforts to maximize short-term profit has degraded the long-term value of many companies. this is 40 minutes. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, -- her work focuses on the intersection of law, business, and morality. she has been a speaker and panelist for events and organizations around the world, including the clinton global initiative. in 2012, she was named a top observer of the economy by the agenda at product. her newest book is the "shareholder value meth -- how putting shareholders' first harms' investors, corporations, and the public." that as a tablet find irresistible. please welcome -- a title i find irresistible. please welcome the professor. [applause] >> thank you, f
of july break. my staff said i am crazy. it was feasible if you went about the work seriously. by the fourth of the library, guess what? all of the bills had been passed. we were able to send everyone of those bills to the president's desk. they were signed in the law with bipartisan support. that sort of work can make a difference. more voices need to be heard in support of that effort. >> my recollection would be since then, it has been budgeting by continuing resolutions. >> we have done an awful lot. a lot of people do not realize we have demonstrated we can do this regular order. the more we move the committee back rather than having everything dominated in a speaker's office, the better off the congress will be. >> who loses and who gains when -- >> who loses and who gains when -- >> the existing agencies have their pipelines already clogged with money and we throw more money at it without any serious oversight. continuing resolutions are ignoring our responsibility and our goal is that we have got a job to do. to see how money is cspent, and to control how it should be
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)